Gwrych Castle, Abergele, North Wales

The Castle Gallery ~ Gwrych in Art

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  And the days go by like a strand in the wind, In the web that is my own. I begin again, Said to my friend, Nothin' else mattered

An untinted lithograph of Gwrych, executed by J P Neale in 1825. It shows the main house before the addtion of the library bay windows.

Gwrych Castle, seat of LHB Hesketh Esq. A tinted lithograph from 1831 by Henry Gastineau

A very moody oil painting of the Castle, showing the romantic and picturesque elements that were so prevalent when the house was built. This portrait was painted during the 1900's.

An oil painting of Gwrych, commissioned during the 1930's, showing the main house as it was during the 1900's. This famous picture was reused as a popular postcard up until the 1960's.

Another oil painting of Gwrych from the early 1950's, showing the Abergele Gates of the Gwrych Castle Estate. These were once the main entrance to the Castle.

Portrayed on a hot summers day during the early 1950's, the parasols are up while the artist captures this beautiful scene through the medium of oils.

A watercolour of the East Front at Gwrych, painted during the 1950's.

Another watercolour of the Castle, looking over the terrace, towards the Main House. Take note of the cafe area and parasols! Painted during the early 1960's.

A pencil sketch of the North Front of the main house, drawn during the late 1970's.

A drawing of the Castle Bar from the early 1980's. This was originally the Library during the Dundonald era.

A simple pen and ink sketch of the view from the Hesketh Tower, early 1990's.

An exquisite and expertly executed oil painting of Gwrych, by the late Derek Jones of Rhyl. Note the artist's brother and sister-in-law standing, looking towards the house! Many thanks to Mr and Mrs Jones.

The Dundonald Family Gallery

©Mark Baker 2003